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Plan 3: Create 300,000 Jobs

Summary

Mark Neumann has experience creating hundreds of Wisconsin jobs in the private sector. Before starting a small business in the basement of his own home, Neumann taught at the college level. Neumann now looks to apply these experiences in his plan to create 300,000 Wisconsin jobs by 2020. Under a Neumann Administration, Research Triangles will be developed to combine the intellectual knowledge found on university campuses with the research needs of the business world. A single Research Triangle in North Carolina helped create tens of thousands of jobs.

Create Research Triangles

Create a series of Research Triangles to attract businesses, create jobs and assure every Wisconsin citizen a share in a growing, more prosperous economy. These Research Triangles will fuse businesses with higher education to attract new businesses and grow current businesses. They can be part of Wisconsin's jobs engine because we can create 30,000 jobs each at ten Wisconsin Research Parks. This economic boom will ensure a growing, prosperous economy, higher pay and more benefits for every Wisconsin family and an environment that encourages our children and theirs to build their lives and raise their children here in Wisconsin.

Connect Education, Business, and Funding

The purpose of the research triangles is to connect the intellectual knowledge available at our technical colleges, our two year universities, and at our four year colleges and universities in Wisconsin with the business leaders in order to create a synergism that encourages our local businesses to grow and expand and that non-Wisconsin businesses will recognize as a significant reason to come to Wisconsin.

Implementing the Plan

Mark Neumann's plan will provide guidance for education leaders on which intellectual areas businesses value, and will provide businesses with the research and skilled workers they need. In Neumann's plan, state economic development teams will be established to connect industries with local colleges for their research and training needs, and attract other similar business to Wisconsin.

An Improved Business Climate

All businesses will be offered a tax incentive to create new jobs in an amount to be determined based on the taxes to be paid over a 5–10 year period by the new employees and/or infrastructure and buildings built for the new businesses. The Neumann Administration will also completely overhaul rules and regulations relating to businesses.

Encourage Entrepreneurs

In 2011–2012, the Neumann Administration will insert up to $11 billion into the Wisconsin economy in the form of a tax cut. When people save this money, it then becomes investment capital for banks to loan to entrepreneurs and small business owners. See Mark Neumann's plan for THE BIGGEST ONE YEAR TAX CUT IN WISCONSIN HISTORY for details on the tax cut.

Current Situation

Wisconsin's Economic Condition

"Research triangles will connect the intellectual knowledge available at Wisconsin universities with business leaders to create a synergism that encourages businesses to grow."

Wisconsin has fallen behind all but 3 states in 5-year personal income growth. Forbes lists Wisconsin as 48th in its 2010 business rankings of the states. The Pew Center on the States names Wisconsin one of the 10 worst states for fiscal stability. During the recession, Wisconsin's job loss was almost 20% greater than the national average.1

Wisconsinites Emigrating from our State

In recent years, approximately 30,000 Wisconsinites have left the state. Those most likely to leave Wisconsin are upper-income workers, according to a study by Princeton University. The study concluded that Wisconsin is more attractive to low-income individuals than to high-wage earners.2

Brain Drain

Many college graduates do not see career opportunities for themselves in Wisconsin. As a result, they leave the state in search of careers in other states. A 2007 study conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater found that this "brain drain" is due to a perception that Wisconsin lacks opportunity. Respondents perceived Wisconsin to be a state with opportunities primarily in agriculture and manufacturing, and incorrectly as a state with few Fortune 500 companies.3

North Carolina's Research Triangle4

All businesses will be offered a tax incentive to create new jobs.

The Research Triangle Park (RTP) in North Carolina was created over 50 years ago. It is now one of the most economically prosperous regions in the world. In the last five years alone, the RTP has created more than 110,000 new jobs across the region.

The RTP combines the research, education and engagement of three research universities with businesses that have research, skill, and training needs in the academic areas provided by those universities. The region is particularly strong in the pharmaceutical, biotech, nanotech, and clean technology areas.

Forbes lists Wisconsin as 48th in its 2010 business rankings of the states.

The economic development team's plan for growth was recognized by the U.S. Department of Commerce as the best regional competitiveness strategy in the country.

Mark Neumann's Plan

Connect Education, Business, and Funding

Each research triangle will center around public and private universities in a local area of Wisconsin. The purpose is to connect the intellectual knowledge available at our colleges, universities and tech schools in Wisconsin with the businesses leaders in order to create a synergism that encourages our local businesses to grow and expand and that non-Wisconsin businesses will recognize as a significant reason to come to Wisconsin. The venture capitalists and banking interests will bring the financial resources necessary for the new and growing businesses to become a reality.

Mark Neumann explains the concept and details of his research triangle plan with Mike Gousha.


Marinette Marine and UW-Milwaukee's School of Freshwater Science are examples of how Research Triangles can work in Wisconsin.

Ideally, the focus of each triangle would be limited to a small number of research areas. For example, one Research Triangle in Wisconsin could become the world's leader in energy research–solar, geothermal and perhaps other energy sources with the intent of Wisconsin leading the way for America to become energy independent from foreign oil. Another example would be a major focus on research related to agriculture, building on our rich heritage in the agriculture industry.

As resources and capabilities grow, more fields for study and research will naturally be appended to each triangle. For example, industries like IT, biomedical, health care, and water are naturally tailored toward Wisconsin's current educational structure.

Example: Marinette Marine

The President and CEO of Marinette Marine recently met with Mark Neumann. He stated definitively that the ability of Northeast Wisconsin Technical College and UW-Marinette to provide an education related to his industry would give him a competitive advantage in a major bidding competition that will bring as many as 7,000 jobs to the area if successful. This competitive advantage in bringing jobs to Wisconsin is the point of this plan.

Example: Freshwater Industry in Milwaukee

UW-Milwaukee's newly-created School of Freshwater Science is the only such school on the Great Lakes, which hold 20% of the world's surface fresh water. The School is partnering with the local businesses, funding agencies, and private schools to create the Milwaukee 7 Water Council. 5 With this partnership, we are well on our way to become a world leader in an increasingly important industry.

Focus on Higher Education

Wisconsin has consistently spent a significant amount on education, yet our workers lag in college degrees.6 In 2007, only 25.4% of the Wisconsin workforce consisted of college graduates—2.1% below the national average.7

Mark Neumann's plan will provide guidance for education leaders on which intellectual areas businesses value, and will provide businesses with the research and skilled workers they need. In Neumann's plan, state economic development teams will be established to connect industries with local colleges for their research and training needs, and attract new businesses to Wisconsin.

All businesses will be offered a tax incentive to create new jobs in an amount to be determined based on the taxes to be paid over a 5–10 year period by the new employees and/or infrastructure and buildings built for the new businesses. The Neumann Administration will also completely overhaul rules and regulations relating to businesses.

In 2011–2012, the Neumann Administration will inject up to $11 billion into the Wisconsin economy in the form of a tax cut.

The UW System has 13 comprehensive campuses and 13 two-year schools, while the vocational-technical system offers 16 colleges with 52 campuses. These and the 20 private colleges are invaluable assets for the state.8 In keeping with the Neumann Administration's plan to have the best educated kids in the world, our colleges and universities need to be producing the kind of graduates that companies will bid each other for.

The Research Triangles will ensure our institutions of higher learning attract grants from corporations and other sources to expand avenues of research and development. These new resources will ensure Wisconsin colleges compete for the best and brightest students in America and around the world, increase the funds needed to upgrade our universities' facilities in every department, and give our graduates an important competitive advantage in the economy.

Economic Development Team

The UW System includes 13 comprehensive campuses and 13 two-year schools. The vocational-technical system offers 16 colleges with 52 campuses. There are 20 private colleges.

Mark Neumann will look for private sector leaders who had successful businesses during this recession and other business-minded people who have met a payroll on a regular basis to fill the positions on the Economic Development Team. Neumann would like to see representation from higher education and small businesses, medium businesses, and large businesses including from the agriculture, manufacturing, technology, transportation, and tourism industries. The size of the team will likely be 20–25 people.

Mark Neumann will appoint private sector people from all sizes of employers to head an economic development team. These people know how to create jobs, and how the government affects commerce between people.


Competitive Advantage

The first job of the Economic Development Team will be to find states that are succeeding in this recession, study exactly why that is occurring while other states are failing, and return with a list of items that account for their success. For example, Site Selection Magazine's review of the best states for business focused on Texas and North Carolina; Iowa's job growth has skyrocketed; and Minnesota's per capita income is 20% higher than Wisconsin's.9

Second, the Economic Development Team will go to Wisconsin's colleges and universities and quantify the intellectual knowledge. The team will then specifically target industries and businesses that match up with the strong academic areas in different parts of the state.

Mark Neumann's Economic Development team will have representation from higher education and small, medium, and large businesses including from agriculture, manufacturing, technology, transportation, and the tourism industries.

Finally, Mark Neumann will take the recommendations and enact executive orders or work with the legislature to surpass every other state in the union, and to make Wisconsin the best place in the world to do business.

A Development Team for Each Research Triangle

The State Economic Development Team will interface with local teams from the research triangles in order to facilitate the implementation of actual business parks within the triangles. The local teams will likely be made up of local leaders with similar qualifications as the State Economic Development Team.

Streamline Government for Businesses

The goal is to make Wisconsin the best, most desirable place in the world for businesses to locate. Wisconsin has the talent, the space and the quality of life, but state government is out of sync. This has to change. Under a Neumann Administration, it will.

A focus on streamlining government processes sends a message to businesses that Wisconsin is ready and able to work with them.

Mark Neumann explains his experience on the frontlines battling senseless regulations, and the necessity to curb them for economic growth


Overhaul Rules & Regulations to Improve the Business Climate

Mark Neumann owns a successful business. He knows firsthand the extent of the hoops Wisconsin businesses have to go through simply to do business in this state. Madison is sending signals to businesses that they should look at starting up in a different state where it is easier to do business.

Wisconsin must dramatically improve its business climate in order to attract and retain jobs. This will necessitate a complete overhaul of rules and regulations relating to businesses, and a complete overhaul of the permitting process.

The goal is to make Wisconsin the best place in the world to do business.

Consistent with the safety and protection of our people and our environment, we must take a radical new look at how we can make Wisconsin a more cost-effective place to do business. Permit processes must be streamlined, inefficiencies must be eliminated and costs must be minimized.

We must, while protecting the people in the State of Wisconsin, develop an environment where it is cost effective to do business in Wisconsin. The time it takes to obtain permits for new businesses in Wisconsin must be made dramatically shorter. Unnecessary or duplicative rules, regulations and paperwork must also be eliminated.

Technology

For the past 20 years, Mark Neumann has used technology solutions to streamline processes and cut costs. He will look to make similar improvements to Wisconsin's government.

Tax Incentives

Any serious plan to attract businesses to Wisconsin will include a significant reduction in taxes in order to make Wisconsin competitive. See Mark Neumann's plan to REDUCE SPENDING AND TAXES for specific information.

Additionally, all businesses will be offered a tax incentive to create new jobs in an amount to be determined based on the taxes to be paid over a 5-10 year period by the new employees and/or infrastructure and buildings built for the new businesses. This both protects the taxpayers of Wisconsin and gives businesses an incentive to grow.

All parties benefitting from the addition of a new business will be brought together with the governor personally leading the effort to attract new business to Wisconsin.

Encourage Entrepreneurs

Last November, the Kauffman Foundation reported that nearly all net job creation came from young companies—those less than five years old. Yet Wisconsin's rankings for small business are at the absolute bottom.10 Wisconsin needs to encourage our entrepreneurial college graduates to stay here instead of moving to Silicon Valley, North Carolina's Research Park, or a different part of the country.

Entrepreneurs often need capital in order to start their business and maintain it through the first few years. See Mark Neumann's plan for THE BIGGEST ONE YEAR TAX CUT IN WISCONSIN HISTORY for details on how, in 2011–2012, the Neumann Administration will insert an additional up to $11 billion into the Wisconsin economy. When people save this money, it becomes investment capital for those banks to loan to entrepreneurs and small business owners.

Mark Neumann's Record

Mark Neumann has decades of experience creating hundreds of Wisconsin jobs. Since 1984, Neumann has created and led several companies, simultaneously creating jobs, offering quality products for consumers, and expanding the economy.

Mark Neumann has also served on the Board of Regents for a private college, chairing the finance committee. This gives Neumann experience in realizing how important grants can be to the educational growth of individuals and institutions.

These are the types of skills and experience Mark Neumann will bring to Madison. Coming from a background of creating jobs and working in the private sector, Neumann understands the problems caused in the business world that emanate from Madison, and will work to make Wisconsin a state where innovation and hard work pay off, not political savvy.

Green Bay Press Gazette

His plan envisions three research triangles in the state similar to North Carolina's Research Triangle Park, which Neumann said has successfully matched university and business leaders to create jobs. The three triangles would include all of the state's major cities, including one triangle that spans Wausau, Green Bay and Fond du Lac.

"North Carolina took an excellent idea and turned it into an economic development powerhouse," Neumann said. "Using this as a starting point, we will create clusters of research triangles that pair higher education closely with businesses like agriculture, manufacturing, IT and energy development."


1 Thomas Hefty & John Torinus Jr., Getting Ahead: Eight Steps to Reinvigorate the Ravaged Wisconsin Economy After a Decade of Decline, 19 WISCONSIN INTEREST 1, March 2010.

2 Thomas Hefty & John Torinus Jr, Falling Behind: Wisconsin Flunks its Economic Test, 18 WISCONSIN INTEREST 2, July, 2009, available at http://wpri.org/WIInterest/Vol18No2/Hefty-Torinus18.2.html.

3 David Niles & Jim Weiss, Study Show Students Don't Perceive Career Opportunities in Wisconsin, Productive Knowledge, Oct. 9, 2007, available at http://www.productiveknowledge.com/braindrainsurvey.php.

4 See The Shape of Things to Come: The Economic Development Strategy for the Research Triangle Region, North Carolina, Research Triangle Regional Partnership, July, 2009.

5 Milwaukee Water Briefing, Milwaukee 7 Water Counsel, March 1, 2010, available at http://www.milwaukee7-watercouncil.com/files/briefing_document_full_03-01-10-2.pdf.

6 Thomas Hefty & John Torinus Jr., Getting Ahead: Eight Steps to Reinvigorate the Ravaged Wisconsin Economy After a Decade of Decline, 19 Wisconsin Interest 1, March 2010.

7 Id.

8 Id.

9 Id.

10 Id.

11 Republican Gubernatorial Candidate Mark Neumann Envisions College-Business Research Triangles, GREEN BAY PRESS-GAZETTE, June 20, 2010, available at http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/article/20100630/GPG0101/6300599/Republican-gubernatorial-candidate-Mark-Neumann-envisions-college-business-research-triangles.


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