Sign up and get involved with other supporters:

 

Mark on:

Download this page as a PDF.

Plan 6: Rebuild Wisconsin Industry

Mark Neumann with Sue on Main Street in Oconto Falls — at Custom Metal Specialists, Inc.

Vision

For generations, Wisconsin has produced quality foods, materials, goods, and services — all things that we take great pride in. Wisconsin has been a leader in industries like manufacturing and agriculture. During World War II, "The Machine Shop of the World" was a title Milwaukee proudly held, as it was widely known that if it couldn't be made in Milwaukee, it couldn't be made anywhere.

While Wisconsin is still home to companies that make some of the best products in the world, our state has lost numerous companies that even to this day are generating growth... just not here. The people of Wisconsin have a work ethic that is unsurpassed by any state, and even when times are tough, we find ways to get by. This state was made great by individuals who knew that the American dream didn't involve reliance on the government and that, when it comes to the money we earned after many hard days of work, it should be us, our families, our churches, our charities — not the government — who are the biggest recipients of the fruits of our labor. For years, politicians have swooped in with rhetoric, hollow promises, and grandiose ideas about what they're going to do for Wisconsin. Sadly, it's those very things that put us on the path we're on today, and drove us further away from what our state used to be. If we're going to stop our state's march down this politically engineered path of endless economic catastrophe, we need to change the way we vet our politicians.

Between January, 2008 and January, 2010, Wisconsin has lost 186,000 jobs.1 Mark Neumann believes we can create more jobs than have disappeared — 300,000 jobs — if we take Wisconsin in a new direction. A new direction means something greater can be returned to the people of Wisconsin: the entrepreneurial freedom that served as the catalyst for building Wisconsin in its glory days. With a government that understands that today's economy is rapidly changing and that entrepreneurs need flexibility and freedom to stay ahead of the competition, our state will be on a course to surpass the "glory days" of yesteryear, and show America and the world that Wisconsin's best days are yet to come.

Summary

The Best Trained Workforce in the World

Mark Neumann's plan starts with the best educated high school graduates in the world, continues with advanced research degree programs that provide companies with the R&D talent they need, and finishes with job-training and continuing education opportunities to allow employees and businesses to remain competitive.

Mark Neumann and Sue at Marinette Marine.

Get Government Out of the Way

Under a Neumann Administration, the government will be streamlined for business interaction. Business-killing rules, regulations, mandates, and taxes will be eliminated, and mandatory business costs will be reduced.

Provide World-Class Infrastructure

The different industries in Wisconsin require different resources in order to prosper, such as a quality transportation network for cargo trucks. Mark Neumann will work with each industry to make sure that the infrastructure they require to do business in Wisconsin is world-class.

Business Leaders in Government

Mark Neumann will form an economic development team made up of private sector individuals from various industries. This team will look at successful states and talk to business leaders to determine exactly why Wisconsin is not the best place in the world to do business, and then work to implement the necessary changes. Bottom line: Mark Neumann is a business leader who will surround himself with other business leaders in order to make Wisconsin the best place in the world to do business. See Mark Neumann's plan to CREATE 300,000 JOBS for details on the economic development team.

Current Situation

Struggling Goods-Producing Industries

Between January, 2000 and January, 2010, employment in every segment of the Goods-Producing industries supersector group2 (Mining & Lodging,3 Manufacturing,4 and Construction5) across the state of Wisconsin has seen staggering declines. In January, 2000, over 25% of Wisconsin's workforce was employed by a business in this supersector. By January, 2010, despite showing a 29% decrease in their workforce size, the Goods Producing Industries supersector still accounted for almost 19% of Wisconsin employment. Over that ten year period, this supersector group has removed 201,900 jobs from Wisconsin.6

Wisconsin's Supersector Employment Leaders

In January, 2010, Wisconsin's top 5 supersector groups employed over 75% of Wisconsin's workforce, representing a decline of around 5% from the same point in 2000. This lower number of decline is influenced dramatically by the growth in government and government supported jobs, including government itself, education, and health related areas paid for by the taxpayers.

Even as Wisconsin's Workforce Shrinks, Government Grows

Between January 2000, and January 2010, Wisconsin's workforce shrunk by almost 4%. During that same time frame, the size of government employment in Wisconsin grew by over 5%.7

This growth has led the government to be Wisconsin's largest employer.8 This is a bad sign for Wisconsin's future. Wisconsin's private sector—led by small businesses—should be the state's economic engine. Not more government. A growing government means more spending, more debt, and more taxes.

Note: see Mark Neumann's plan to STRENGHTEN RURAL WISCONSIN for details on the agriculture industry.

Most Wisconsin Regions are Weak, but Not All

Between January 2000, and January 2010, Wisconsin's workforce shrunk by almost 4%. During that same time frame, the size of government employment in Wisconsin grew by over 5%.

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly tracks 11 regions that are solely in Wisconsin. 8 of the 11 regions saw a reduction in the size of their workforce, 1 saw no change, and 2 regions have grown over the last two years.9

Both Madison and Eau Claire have exhibited growth in their workforce over the last ten years. The chart below displays two bars for each region, one for the change the overall size of the workforce, and then another for the change in the overall size of the workforce, excluding government employees.10

For a variety of reasons these two regions have been able to thrive. Their success should be evaluated by future administrations to find way to make all of Wisconsin successful.

Mark Neumann's Plan

Most industries in Wisconsin have seen year-over-year declines in the size of overall workforce for at least a decade. As a business owner, Mark Neumann knows first-hand how the policies enacted by career politicians in Madison have had a direct impact on the declining job market. Neumann also sees great potential for Wisconsin to become globally competitive by strengthening our core competencies and focusing on developing the foundation needed to research, develop, manufacture, and train in the technologies of tomorrow.

Provide Industry with the Best Trained Workforce in the World

Mark Neumann will work with educators and industry leaders to create opportunities for high school and college students to take career-track programs that will better prepare them for the workforce. For example, Neumann's Research Triangles proposal will match the intellectual capital at our universities with business leaders to ensure students acquire the job skills they want and businesses desire.

World-Class High School Graduates

Before Wisconsin can fully implement the blueprint necessary to become a global leader in producing the technology and jobs of tomorrow, changes need to be made in the state's education system. Mark Neumann's plan for EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION will reintroduce accountability at all levels of the education system, restore local control while removing bureaucratic rules, regulations, and mandates, and encourage competition among public and private educational institutions to make sure that Wisconsin has the best educated high school graduates in the world. The plan also follows the business model of Jack Welch rewarding excellence in education.

Job Training and Continuing Education

In today's job economy, continual education is often required to remain competitive; both for businesses and workers. Mark Neumann's research triangle proposal matches up companies with corresponding job-training specialties at local colleges, universities, and tech schools. If a company needs their employees trained in a certain field—be it ship building, nanotechnology, or global finance—Wisconsin's fine educational institutions are ready to provide such education.

Advanced Degrees and Academic Research

Many companies require constant research and development in order to stay ahead of their competitors. The economic development teams created by a Neumann Administration will quantify the Ph.D. and high-level research specialties at the Wisconsin educational institutions and then actively recruit companies with those research needs to locate to Wisconsin. Students in those education tracts will then have specialized internship opportunities and the businesses will have highly trained employees upon graduation. The students will look to work in the industry they studied, and a Neumann Administration will work to make sure the top companies in that industry are right here in Wisconsin.

Get Government Out of the Way

Mark Neumann will work to remove unnecessary government oversight and regulation on Wisconsin industries and organizations, allowing them to spend more of their time, money, and energy on building their businesses and creating quality jobs in Wisconsin. Under a Neumann Administration, starting, maintaining, and growing a business in Wisconsin will be easier than it has ever been before, driven by the spirit of Wisconsin entrepreneurism.

Reduce Taxes

Mark Neumann understands that government spending must be reduced before taxes can be cut. He has a plan to reduce spending and cut taxes by 24% in the next 8 years. This will allow for systematic cuts in every tax area and to repeal the Doyle tax hikes; from income tax cuts for the middle class to repealing combined reporting in order to encourage companies to remain in Wisconsin. See Mark Neumann's plan to CUT SPENDING AND REDUCE TAXES for more details .

Streamline Government for Business

Neumann will work with the various state departments and agencies to determine ways that processes that normally require in-person or telephone contact can be streamlined into processes that can be handled easily by most businesses using the internet, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Lower Health Care Costs

Mark Neumann believes it is critical that people have access to affordable, quality health care. That's why in his own businesses Mark has gone the extra mile to ensure that his employees have excellent health care coverage. In fact, Mark takes the same health care plan that he offers his employees.

Most people get their health care from their employer. Government health care costs can be a major drain on a business, often taking the place of adding jobs or doing the necessary research to remain competitive. Under ObamaCare, these costs will only skyrocket. Mark Neumann will fight back against ObamaCare and then implement a 10-point health care plan for Wisconsin that will lower costs while increasing access and coverage. These changes will improve health care in Wisconsin and give our state a competitive advantage against other states to attract more businesses because their costs will be lower and they will be able to offer a better health care program for less. See Mark Neumann's plan to REFORM HEALTH CARE IN WISCONSIN for more details .

Provide a World-Class Infrastructure for Business.

As the core elements of Neumann's plan to strengthen Wisconsin's industry are put into place, the State will also begin to look at improving existing infrastructure, with the goal of getting new businesses to begin establishing roots in the region, and existing businesses to begin expanding. Each industry will have different infrastructure requirements.

Mark Neumann describes his stance on the importance of segregated funds and his plan for repairing infrastructure.


Example: Transportation Infrastructure

A Neumann Administration will ensure that transportation dollars are spent responsibly and transparently on developing and maintaining the infrastructure necessary to handle an expanding import/export economy, while at the same time drawing transport traffic from other hubs throughout Midwest. Under a Neumann Administration, Wisconsin's roads, ports, railways, and airports will never be a deterrent for importing or exporting goods, and growing Wisconsin's economy.

As an example, the Milwaukee area is home to one of the most widely used ports in the region—and has even drawn more waterborne commerce than Chicago.11 With the Port of Milwaukee's proximity to air, rail, and interstate roadways, in conjunction with well established docking spaces, there is great potential to further expand port traffic, generating a trickle-down effect for job creation in the region. As the region reshapes itself for a new economy, having solid infrastructure for import/export traffic is going to be essential.

Example: Technology Infrastructure

Certain industries require a top-of-the-line technology infrastructure in order to compete. Parts of Wisconsin are currently sitting on stretches of the internet backbone and Wisconsin is not actively promoting this valuable resource. Among these areas of the state with the biggest stretches of internet backbone is a triangle which points at St. Paul, MN, Madison, WI, and Dubuque, IA. Neumann will work local leaders to formulate a plan to develop technology corridors located in close proximity to the Internet Backbone.

Beyond the stretches of Internet Backbone that already exist; this same triangle is slated for an upgrade,12 paving the way for high-tech companies who are looking for direct access to a telecommunications system that will give them the opportunity to stay ahead of the competition. A Neumann Administration will market this technology infrastructure to high-tech and telecommunications companies that require such services, and ask them to bring their companies to Wisconsin.

Also, see Mark Neumann's plan to STRENGTHEN RURAL WISCONSIN for Neumann's commitment to have 95% high-speed internet coverage in Wisconsin.

Mark Neumann's Roadmap to Reform

These four common sense principles will be applied to transportation in Wisconsin.

  • Fiscal Responsibility. As Governor, Mark Neumann will reject the practice of raiding the transportation fund to pay for other projects. Neumann will also set a limit on the amount of bonding each year to ensure the state isn't deficit-spending at the expense of the taxpayer.
  • Economic Development. Appropriate funding levels must be available to maintain or expand our infrastructure and meet the needs of companies and individuals in our state.
  • Political Neutrality. As with every other decision made by the Neumann Administration, political favoritism will not factor into awarding of contracts. All decisions will be based on overall need, cost, and safety requirements.
  • Transparency. All major transportation decisions will be made in full public view to ensure citizens are adequately notified. This will give them the ability and opportunity to ask questions and voice concerns. There will be an open bid process used and all hearings regarding the decision process for the allocation of transportation dollars will be open to the public.

1 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000000000000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for all non-farm industries).

2 For purposes of analysis, the US Economic Classification Policy Committee aggregated NAICS sectors into groupings called 'Supersectors.' NAICS Supersectors for the CES Program, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, last accessed July 27, 2010, http://www.bls.gov/ces/cessuper.htm (defining term "supersector" as used in data sets).

3 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000001000000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing the employment data for the "Mining and Lodging" supersector).

4 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000003000000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for the "Manufacturing" supersector).

5 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000002000000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for the "Construction" supersector).

6 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000000000000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for all non-farm industries).

7 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000009000000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for the "Government" supersector).

8 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000009091000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for the "Federal Government" section of the "Government" supersector); Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000009092000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for the "State Government" section of the "Government" supersector); Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics ,data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55000009093000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for the "Local Government" section of the "Government" supersector).

9 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55*****0000000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for the for all employees in specific region, including government employees. To access region, replace the "*****" in the URL with the 5 digit BLS area code: Madison: 31540, Eau Claire: 20740, Oshkosh: 36780, Appleton: 11540, Green Bay: 24580, Wausau: 48140, Sheboygan: 43100, Milwaukee: 33340, Fond du Lac: 22540, Racine: 39540, Janesville: 27500).

10 Databases, Tables, & Calculators by Subject: State and Area Employment, Hours, and Earnings, United States Department of Labor: Bureau of Labor Statistics, data extracted on July 24, 2010, http://data.bls.gov/PDQ/servlet/SurveyOutputServlet?series_id=SMU55*****0500000001&data_tool=XGtable (showing employment data for the for all non-government employees in specific region. To access region, replace the "*****" in the URL with the 5 digit BLS area code: Madison: 31540, Eau Claire: 20740, Oshkosh: 36780, Appleton: 11540, Green Bay: 24580, Wausau: 48140, Sheboygan: 43100, Milwaukee: 33340, Fond du Lac: 22540, Racine: 39540, Janesville: 27500).

11 David Baker, Story of a Harbor, Milwaukee Magazine, Feb. 23, 2009, available at http://www.milwaukeemagazine.com/currentissue/full_feature_story.asp?newmessageid=24470.

12 Allied Fiber, http://www.alliedfiber.com/documents/AlliedFiber_StatSheet_001.pdf


Mark wants to hear from you!
Message Mark directly:


 

 

 
loader

Thank you. Your message
has been submitted.

Stay Connected.

With your account, you gain insider access to the campaign. You can also create your own blog, plan and attend events, invite your friends, get customized candidate information, and much more!


Join the team today.

Home About Mark Issues Blog Events Contribute Contact FAQ

Paid for by Mark Neumann for Governor, Matt Neumann, Treasurer.

Login

loader

Close

Continue Login


loader


Forgot your password?
Close

Become a member

Fill out your information and create a password.







loader

By creating your account, you accept the terms and conditions specified in the User Agreement.


Connect with Facebook

You can also connect using Facebook Connect:

Close

Please Wait

Connecting to Facebook... loader

tweetie Send your Tweet directly from www.markforgov.com!

Please wait - shortening URL. spinnie
Close

Get QR Code

Loading QR Code for this page below:

Close